Other Standards

EN 10025: 2004

"Hot Rolled Products of Structural Steels"
This is the harmonized European standard for structural steel, produced by Technical Committee 103 of the European Committee for Iron and Steel Standardization (ECISS), which is part of the European Committee for Standardization (CEN) (
www.cen.eu).

The standard has 6 parts. Part 1 sets out general delivery conditions; Part 2 applies to non-alloy structural steels (e.g., S355J); Part 3 applies to normalized weldable fine grain steels (e.g., S355N); Part 4 applies to thermomechanically rolled weldable fine grain steels (e.g., S355M); Part 5 applies to structural steels with improved atmospheric corrosion resistance; and Part 6 sets out the delivery conditions for high yield strength structural steel in the quenched and tempered condition (e.g., S690Q and S690QL). Our HS 100 grade includes steels from Part 6 of this standard.

The letter "S" at the beginning of the designation stands for "structural steel".  The number (e.g., 690) indicates the minimum yield strength in MPa at a plate thickness of 16mm. The letter at the end of the number (e.g., J, N, M, Q and QL) indicates the minimum required longitudinal Charpy V-notch values at a plate thickness of 16mm. Q means 40J at -20C. QL means 50J at -40C. QL1 means 60J at -60C. 

ISO 4950-3
"High yield strength flat steel products -- Part 3: Products supplied in the heat-treated (quenched + tempered) condition"
The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) (www.iso.org) standard for high yield strength flat steel products supplied in the quenched and tempered condition (e.g., E690). The standard specifies chemical and mechanical properties.
JIS G3128
"High Yield Strength Steel Plates for Welded Structures"
The Japanese Standards Association (www.jsa.or.jp) standard for quenched and tempered structural steel (e.g., SHY 685).
AS 3597
"Structural and pressure vessel steel - Quenched and tempered plate"
The Standards Australia (www.standards.org.au) standard for quenched and tempered structural steel (e.g., Grade 700).
AISI Designations
The American Institute of Iron and Steel (AISI) represents raw steel producer members and associate member suppliers. In collaboration with the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), AISI established a system for structural shapes that involves a four-number designation reflecting chemical composition. The first two numbers indicate the primary alloy content (with 10 used for carbon), and the last two numbers give the approximate percentage of carbon in the steel (three numbers are used if the percentage of carbon is over 1.00%). For example, 1045 represents a carbon content of roughly 0.45%, while 4140 represents a Chromium-Molybdenum alloy with roughly 0.40% carbon. Our HS 100 grade in certain applications can be an appropriate upgrade for 4140 steel, among others. See: www.steel.org.
SAE Designations
The Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), in collaboration with the American Institute of Iron and Steel (AISI), established a system for structural shapes that involves a four-number designation reflecting chemical composition. SAE also produces its own standards governing chemical composition and mechanical properties (for example, J1392, "Steel, High Strength, Hot Rolled Sheet and Strip, Cold Rolled Sheet, and Coated Sheet"). See: www.sae.org.
UNS Designations
The Unified Numbering System for Metals (UNS) is an all-encompassing classification system developed by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) and the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) in the 1970s. The UNS designation consists of a prefix letter indicating the primary metal group (for example, S for stainless steels, and G for AISI and SAE carbon and alloy steels), followed by five digits. In many cases, the digits incorporate identification numbers from other systems. For example, the UNS designation G10200 covers AISI 1020 carbon steel.
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